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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
behind. eugene robinson, joy reid, dorian, thank you for joining us. >>> chris matthews is up next tonight. >>> tonight, we bring to you my interview with president barack obama. this is the historic passing of his personal hero, nelson mandela, an event that msnbc will be covering for the rest of the evening. i have covered two great events in my career. one was the fall of the berlin wall in 1989 and the other was the election in south africa five years later. i was there when the black majority voted by the millions, stretching from one horizon so the other. i saw firsthand the devotion to democracy and the great legacy of the man who died today. president obama paid tribute to nelson mandela today. through his fierce dignity, an unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others he transformed south africa and moved all of us. embodied the that countries can change for the better. his commitment for the power and reconcile with those who jailed him set an example for all humanity to aspire to, whether in the lives of nations or in our own personal lives. >>>
want to thank everyone for being with us tonight here. and thank you, president obama, of course for being our guest on the "hardball" college tour. and also to the american university for hosting us. good night. >>> good evening from new york. i'm chris hayes. a moral titan, a hero for the ages, one of the greatest men of our time is dead tonight. nelson mandela passing away today at the age of 95. shortly after his death, south african president jacob zuma addressed the nation. >> fellow south africans, our beloved nelson mandela, the founding president of our democratic nation has departed. our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. >> south africa and the world in mourning at this moment. world leaders expressing their condolences. president obama addressed us earlier this evening. >> he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today he's gone home. and we've lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. i am one of the countless millions who drew inspirat
of us could lead a country out of an era of apartheid and lead with humility. president obama, i remember the last time he came here, he came here to thank people for their support in the solidarity movement. he just came to say thank you. what a sense of humility and an awesome spirit this man had. and his spirit is going to live forever. >> i want to talk about the particularities of this man's life and some of the different chapters of it. most specifically next, i want to talk about the nature of the apartheid regime, which is so removed from us, we know it was a racist regime. but it was a truly evil and outlaw regime. and what his life in prison and in hiding looked like and how the end of that regime was brought about. so stick around. we're going to talk about that. if you're seeing spots before your eyes... it's time... for aveeno® positively radiant face moisturizer. [ female announcer ] only aveeno® has an active naturals total soy formula that instantly brightens skin. and helps reduce the look of brown spots in just 4 weeks. for healthy radiant skin. try it for a m
technology, thank you. joining me is dr. kavita batel, senior adviser to valerie jarrett in the obama administration, a fellow at the brookings institution. how are you feeling today? >> oh, a lot better than about a month ago, chris. >> well, you hit it well when i talked to you. you brought optimism and cheer to me when i was letting some of the panic get to me. what do you think this means? how big a deal is today? >> so, it's a big deal for all the reasons you've outlined, but going back to even why i was optimistic a month ago, as you covered it, in california and in other states, like kentucky, even despite this horrific website kind of rollout, it was working in places. so, i think that today is important. i don't think we should kind of say, all right, you know, hands up, we're done. >> nope. >> i think we still have -- let's be honest, we've got to make sure that we can get to december 23rd, which is, like, the last day possible to get people started on coverage on january 1st. and that's why people on the ground in the united states that are actually doing kind of the outrea
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)